Author

Pamela Linton

Date of Award:

2001

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Family, Consumer, and Human Development

Advisor/Chair:

Scot M. Allgood

Abstract

Medication compliance/noncompliance was examined in context of: severity of symptoms; medical side effects; medication education; perceived stigma; and effects on family/social support system. A null hypothesis was formulated for each correlate, stating that those patients who reported a high level of an independent variable (IV) would not be any more likely to discontinue their medication than patients who reported a low level of an IV. To obtain data, a medical usage questionnaire and a depression, assessment (OQT"-45.2) were used. Statistical significance was not obtained for any of the hypothesized relationships but trends were consistent with the established literature. The implication points to the efficacy of relational therapy as a conjunct to the medical treatment of depression.

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