Date of Award:

1956

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Plants, Soils, and Climate

Advisor/Chair:

DeVere R. Mcallister

Abstract

Extensive land areas in arid and semi-arid regions contain excessive amounts of salt which inhibit or prevent the growth of desirable crop plants. This problem is increasing with the development of extensive irrigation projects. The future of irrigation agriculture will depend upon the development and the utilization of means of (1) preventing salt accumulation, (2) reclaiming salted soils. and (3) making the best use of those soils which by reason of drainage problems, soil texture and permeability, poor quality irrigation water, etc. are unsuited for economic reclamation.

The utilization of land that is not feasible to completely reclaim, at least under present economic conditions, will depend upon the selection, development, and use of varieties and strains of crop plants which will produce economically under such conditions.

The objectives of this research are to (1) test on a preliminary basis the salt tolerance of a number of promising crop plant materials. (2) observe the effect of salt upon plant behavior and growth, and (3) develop various methods of evaluating plant materials for salt tolerance.

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