Date of Award:

1987

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Economics and Finance

Department name when degree awarded

Economics

Advisor/Chair:

E. Bruce Godfrey

Abstract

This study analyzes aspects of Wild and Free-Roaming Horse and Burro adoptions. After primary data are gathered by a questionnaire sent to wild horse and burro adopters, various statistics, and regression test results are reported, which indicate that the demand for the wild horses is multifaceted and that the wild animals are not a homogeneous product. The results overwhelmingly indicate that young and female horses are preferred by the majority of adopters. This finding had supportive evidence in both a price determination model as well as adopters ' responses to the survey that was conducted as a part of this study. This study found that many adopters value their adopted animals very highly, while others have not had the best experience.

Because of a combination of public laws and land use plans, there are about 10,000 unadopted animals being maintained by the Bureau of Land Management at an estimated cost of $10 million per year. Currently, there is no foreseeable solution for this situation.

Included in

Economics Commons

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