Date of Award:

1954

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Wildland Resources

Department name when degree awarded

Wildlife Management

Advisor/Chair:

Dr. Jessop B. Low

Abstract

The particular purpose of this study was to determine the effects of large-scale sagebrush reseeding projects on sage grouse populations and whether such effects were partly or entirely beneficial, neutral, or detrimental to the survival of such populations.

During two seasons of field work, the studies initiated on a short-time basis had the following specific objectives:

  1. To compare the utilization by sage grouse of reseeded and non-reseeded lands for the seasonal activities of mating, nesting, raising a brood, fall coveying, and wintering.
  2. To compare the utilization by sage grouse of reseeded and non-reseeded lands for daily activities of feeding, watering, resting, hiding, and roosting.
  3. To determine fall and winter movements of the grouse in relation to reseeded lands.
  4. To determine the food and cover available to grouse on randomly selected sample plots
  5. To arrive at an index to food preferences through comparison of stomach analysis and food availability studies.
  6. To determine the effect of livestock grazing of reseeded lands on sage grouse.
  7. To determine the effect of plant succession on availability of food and cover within reseeded lands.

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