Date of Award:

2015

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Mathematics and Statistics

Advisor/Chair:

Kady Schneiter

Abstract

Dweck's mindset, math anxiety, multiplication skills, and attitudes toward mathematics were measured and used to predict student success in developmental math courses as measured by percent of points earned and pass rates. A pre/post survey design research study was conducted with students in Math 990, Math 1010, and Math 1050 at Utah State University. Data were analyzed using linear regression to predict percent of points earned and logistic regression to predict pass rates.

Math anxiety was found to have a large and statistically signicant negative effect on student course grades and pass rates. Dweck's mindset was found to be a strong predictor of student success. Multiplication skills were related to student success as measured in percent of points earned in the course, particularly in beginning algebra courses. Students' attitudes toward mathematics, particularly perceived ability and interest in mathematics, predicted very large differences in student achievement and pass rates.

The data supported claims that anxiety impacts students' ability to do mathematics and achieve. Dweck's research on mindset and previous research was also supported through the analyses performed. Evidence supports previously made attempts at interventions targeted toward student anxiety and changing students' mindset, as noted by Hattie and Dweck.

Included in

Mathematics Commons

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