Date of Award:

1967

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Sciences

Department name when degree awarded

Food Science and Technology

Advisor/Chair:

D. K. Salunkhe

Abstract

Studies were conducted using four phosphate compounds: sodium hexametaphosphate, sodium tripolyphosphate, sodium tetraphosphate, and tetrasodium pyrophosphate at 1, 5, and 10 per cent concentrations to ascertain their effects on fresh cherries, as well as their in vitro antimycotic effects against Botrytis sp., Penicillium expansum, and Rhizopus nigricans.

A. summary of the findings are as follows:

1. Sodium tetraphosphate appeared to be the most effective antimycotic compound used in this investigation. A 10 per cent concentration of sodium tetraphosphate appeared to be the most effective antimycotic compound used in this investigation. A 10 per cent concentration of sodium tetraphosphate inhibited fungal growth on fresh cherries up to 30 days of storage at 34 degrees Farenheight and 94 per cent relative humidity, while the untreated controls showed fungal growth after 14 days at refrigeration storage.

2. Microscopic observations of treated lots of cherries revealed that the infecting fungi were predominantly Botrytis and Penicillium species. Penicillium was observed in all the control lots and caused the greatest amount of fungal infection.

3. In the in vivo and in vitro studies it was confirmed that an order of decreasing preservative effectiveness was sodium tetraphosphate, sodium hexametaphosphate, sodium tripolyphosphate, and tetrasodium pyrophosphate respectively.

Checksum

278cc74cad24aafd3dce783e1a48507e

Included in

Food Science Commons

Share

COinS