Date of Award:

1979

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Sciences

Department name when degree awarded

Nutrition and Food Science

Advisor/Chair:

Dr. Von T. Mendenhall

Abstract

The turkey industry is concerned with the effects of added dietary fat on turkey carcass composition. Rations were formulated containing different levels of added dietary fat, both with and without an adjustment i n dietary protein level. Orlopp 91 tom turkeys were fed diets containing 2 percent added fat (control), 4 percent added fat (energy/protein ratio constant with the control), 6 percent added fat (energy/protein ratio constant with the control), and a diet containing 6 percent added fat with a higher energy/protein ratio than the control. Data collected in the study showed that the percent fat in the dry matter of the turkey carcass increased more as a result of increasing the nutrient density of the diet than by increasing the diet energy level alone. This finding is contrary to current feeding assumptions which state that carcass composition should not be affected by energy level if a constant energy/protein ratio is maintained . The most significant effects of added dietary fat on turkey carcass composition occurred in the viscera and the skin. Increased dietary fat level with an increase in dietary protein level to maintain the same energy/protein ratio resulted in a statistically significant increase in the percent fat in the dry matter of the skin and the viscera. Percent fat in the dry matter of the light meat and dark meat showed sim.ilar trends due to increases in dietary fat levels. These differences were not statistically significant. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the percent fat in the dry matter of the skin and the percent fat in the dry matter of the viscera. Lower, but still statistically significant positive correlations were also noted between the percent fat in the dry matter of the light meat and dark meat, viscera and light meat and the skin and light meat. There was also a significant correlation between the percent fat in the dry matter of the skin and the percent skin in the dressed turkey.

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