Date of Award:

1975

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Erwin Nielsen

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine differences in anxiety levels between the sexes and between sex role identification groups (as defined by scores on a test of masculinity-femininity). Possible explanations for these differences were explored using a questionnaire made up of an openness versus closedness scale, a liberalism versus conservatism scale, and a cross-sex versus same-sex parent identification scale.

A sample of 108 females and 71 males was administered Gough's Femininity Scale, Cattell's IPAT Anxiety Scale Questionnaire, Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale, and a questionnaire devised for this particular study.

The sexes did not differ significantly in anxiety level but it was found that feminine persons of both sexes had higher anxiety levels on both of the anxiety scales employed. Females were more open than males on the openness versus closedness scale and feminine persons of both sexes were more open than masculine persons. This study suggests the possibility that higher anxiety levels in females and feminine persons may be due to greater openness.

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