Date of Award:

1973

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

David R. Stone

Abstract

Two experimental studies were reported in which attempts were made to increase resistance to the negative effects of set. Set interference was measured by performance on 1) a task in which a set was experimentally induced, 2) a series of problems presumed to involve implicit sets, and 3) a test of creativity presumed to involve implicit sets.

The experimental treatments consisted of tasks which required set-breaking. An important aspect of this research was that no hints or instructions concerning sets were provided.

The findings offer modest support for the view that learning experiences can be designed which will increase resistance to interference from set. Suggestions for future research on this problem were discussed. These experiments utilized a novel research design in which each group of subjects acted as both an experimental and a control group. Thus, each study was, in essence, two studies. The advantages and limitations of this design were discussed.

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