Date of Award:

1977

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Richard B. Powers

Abstract

The effects of self-recording bites and weight on subsequent weigh t was assessed utilizing a single-subject design. Subjects were exposed to a similar sequence of conditions which included: (1) weekly weigh-ins, ( 2) self-recording daily weights, (3) a control for observation, (4) self-recording bites, and finally (5) a reversal condition in which subjects stopped recording bites but continued recording weights and meeting for weekly weigh-ins. No significant weight reductions occurred in conjunction with weekly weigh-ins, self recording daily weights, or the control for observation. Five of the six subjects lost more than 2 pounds while recording bites along with monitoring daily weights and weekly weigh-ins. During reversal, 5 of the 6 subjects maintained the weight loss over the 2 to 4 week condition. variables related to the interaction between self-recording bites and eating were suggested as a possible explanation for the results.

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Psychology Commons

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