Date of Award:

1978

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

E. Wayne Wright

Abstract

The purpose of the present investigation was two-fold: (1) to develop a training procedure which might be helpful in trying to teach beginning counselors how to recognize levels of anxiety by observing silent, nonverbal behavior of clients in association with EMG feedback, and (2) to assess the effectiveness of this procedure by using it to train a group of graduate psychology students. Graduate trainees exposed to the training procedure were compared with a control group of students to determine whether the training procedure effectively taught the skill.

Using the split image capabilities of a videotape recorder, video tapes were made of simulated interview situations in which clients were subjected to anxiety-inducing content and/or discussion. During each interview, EMG feedback, or 11 levels of muscle tension,'' were recorded in the upper right hand portion of the video monitor. The recorded interviews were made without audio recording so that only the clients' nonverbal behaviors, in association with visual

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Included in

Psychology Commons

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