Date of Award:

2007

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Gretchen Gimpel Peacock

Abstract

Parent training combined with problem solving skills training has been proposed as a comprehensive treatment for childhood oppositional behaviors, poor child social skills, and parental stress . The current study compared Parent Training + Problem Solving Skills Training with a Parent Training + nondirective condition. Parents of 32 children first attended Parent Training . After the parents completed Parent Training, children were randomly assigned to individual therapy in either a Problem Solving Skills Training condition or a nondirective condition. Data comparisons between the groups were made at postindividual therapy and at 6-week follow-up. Results indicated that children in the Problem Solving Skills Training condition improved more than their counterparts regarding parent-reported, parent-observed, and child-reported social skills. Children in the Problem Solving Skills Training condition also improved more than children in the nondirective condition on parent-observed oppositional behaviors ; however , children in the non-directive condition demonstrated more improvement than their Problem Solving Skills Training counterparts on parent-reported measures of oppositional behaviors . There were no differences between the groups regarding parental stress. The clinical implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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