Date of Award:

1999

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Biology

Advisor/Chair:

Mary E. Barkworth

Abstract

Shifting perspectives on restoration and management of public lands in the inland West have resulted in an increased need for maps of potential natural vegetation which cover large areas at sufficient scale to delineate individual stands . In this study, classification tree modeling was used to predictively model and map the plant association types of a relatively undisturbed wilderness area in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. Models were developed using field data and data derived from a geographic information system database. Elevation, slope, aspect, annual precipitation, solar radiation, soil type, and topographic position were important predictor variables. The model predicted plant association types with a relatively high degree of accuracy for most plant association types, with the lowest accuracy for the types within the grand fir series. Fuzzy confusion analysis was used to analyze model performance, and indicated the overall model accuracy was 72%.

Checksum

4f39150796f1123f658f6c386ad438f3

Included in

Biology Commons

Share

COinS