Date of Award:

5-1962

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

History

Advisor/Chair:

S. George Ellsworth

Co-Advisor/Chair:

W. R. Merrill

Abstract

Utah existed as a territory for some forty-five years, 1851-1896. During these years Utah continued to occupy an interesting and controversial position on the national scene. The fact that Utah was predominantly Mormon, and that the Mormons were unusual in their beliefs and practices, made the territory and its people a target for the law-making body of the nation as well as the general citizenry. Utah was made an integral part of the congressional discussions and debates in almost every session of Congress during the period of 1851-1896, and there were repeated attempts to punish the Mormons for their "anachronistic" practices.

The major link and contact between Utah and the national government was the territorial delegate. It was his responsibility to represent fairly the interests of Utah in Congress and attempt to present the issues in a manner that would facilitate favorable action and legislation in behalf of Utah. This delegate was a voteless agent and was virtually without power or authority at the seat of government. Nevertheless, his constituents respected and depended upon him.

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