Date of Award:

5-1991

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Environment and Society

Department name when degree awarded

Forest Resources

Advisor/Chair:

Michael Jenkins

Abstract

This thesis examined how cross-country skiers perceive and prepare for winter hazards. A self-completion questionnaire was administered to cross-country skiers in northern Utah. The questions on the questionnaire were designed to explore the relationships that affect how skiers perceive and prepare for winter hazards. Additionally, the situation where skiers put themselves at risk due to lack of information as opposed to skiers placing themselves at risk through the desire to confront nature's dangers was explored. Variables that were contained in these relationships were correlated and the degree of correlation was measured.

Those that sought information on the day surveyed were more likely to perceive and prepare for winter hazards than those that didn't seek information. Additionally, experienced skiers were more likely to perceive and prepare for winter hazards. However, experienced skiers were more likely to be involved in other risk recreation activities and to consider risk important in their ski experience than less experienced skiers.

Skiers that believed skiing to be central to their life interests were more likely to seek avalanche hazard information and be more prepared than those that didn't seek avalanche information.

Results suggest more research is needed to determine the most effective techniques of disseminating hazard information to cross-country skiers. Moreover, different survey techniques, such as naturalistic inquiries, should be used to extract hazard perception and preparation information from skiers.

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