Date of Award:

8-2020

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Educational Specialist (EdS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Gretchen Peacock

Co-Advisor/Chair:

Shelley Lindauer

Third Advisor:

Greg Callan

Abstract

Many studies have examined the academic benefits of parents reading with their children, but few studies have looked at the psychological and social benefits, and even fewer have related the quality of shared book reading to psycho-social benefits. This study looked at whether positive and negative reading interactions during shared book reading predicted parent-child relationships, child social skills and child academic skills. Twenty-five parents of 4-year-olds read a story with their child and completed parent relationship and child social skills questionnaires. The reading interactions were then coded into two separate composite scores: positive and negative. Positive interactions did not significantly predict any of the variables studied, but negative reading interactions predicted lower parent involvement, lower child engagement, and lower child communication skills. Reading behaviors approached significance for predicting child’s ability to understand the sounds that make up a word, but not child letter knowledge. Implications and future research are discussed.

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