Date of Award:

8-2020

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

School of Teacher Education and Leadership

Committee Chair(s)

Suzanne H. Jones

Committee

Suzanne H. Jones

Committee

Max L. Longhurst

Committee

Sylvia Read

Committee

Amy Piotrowski

Committee

Jessica Rivera-Mueller

Abstract

The purpose of the current study is to explore the espoused beliefs and enacted practices of secondary English Language Arts teachers with regards to writing instruction and how these beliefs correlate with teacher self-efficacy beliefs. The study worked to build upon the literature mainly in the fields of mathematics and science in order to explore what the perceived and enacted beliefs are and how they affect the self-efficacy belief of teachers within the field of writing instruction in the high school classroom. The study used a collective case study design in order to better understand what espoused and enacted pedagogical beliefs different teachers have and their levels of self-efficacy as teachers of writing. Findings indicate that teachers rely heavily on mentor teachers, colleagues, and their own classroom experiences as sources of teaching knowledge. Teacher espoused beliefs, when examined holistically, show alignment with their enacted practices. With regards to instructional scaffolding and student comprehension, English teachers in the same school tend to hold strongly similar beliefs.

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