Date of Award:

8-2022

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling

Committee Chair(s)

Michelle McKnight Lizotte

Committee

Michelle McKnight Lizotte

Committee

Robert Morgan

Committee

Brian Phillips

Committee

Maryellen McClain

Committee

Wilhelmina van Dijk

Abstract

Inclusive postsecondary education programs (IPSE) for students with intellectual disabilities (ID) are relatively new, having their formal beginning in the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA; P.L. 110-315) of 2008. These programs vary greatly and are found in urban, suburban, and rural areas of the United States. Those programs in rural areas face unique barriers and have unique strengths that affect how they collaborate and with whom they collaborate. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study is to describe the collaborative practices of rural IPSE program directors. This study gathered the lived experiences of rural IPSE program directors collaborating with agencies on- and off-campus through semi-structured interviews conducted via Zoom. Data were coded and analyzed for themes and patterns. These themes and patterns, as well as the essence of their collaborative experiences, are described and related to the Trainor et al. (2020) Framework for Transition.

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