Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

An Analysis of the Brigham City Fault Segment using Electrical Resistivity Tomography Techniques

Presenter Information

Alex BarkerFollow

Class

Article

Department

Physics

Faculty Mentor

Tony Lowry

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Geologic faults are a result of rock structures that have given away to either tectonic compression, extension, or lateral tension. Because of their propensity to slip and cause earthquakes, they are of major concern to any populated area. The Wasatch Fault is a result of extensional stress that runs the entire length of Utah from north the south. It has been analyzed and broken up into several segments. By stratigraphic analysis, scientists have been able to estimate when each of these segments has last experienced a rupture. Out of all the segments that make up the Wasatch Fault, the Brigham City segment has not experienced movement for the longest period of time. It has been estimated that this segment will be the next segment to slip and cause an earthquake. For the safety of the Brigham City population and its surrounding cities, it is imperative that scientists continue to gather data and evaluate this hazard in order to more accurately predict when slippage will occur. If left unchecked, Brigham City, with a population of approximately 20,000 people, could be at risk for a major earthquake. Water plays a role in the mechanics of fault rupture. Water can act as a lubricant, thereby influencing when and how much slippage occurs. By comparing moisture content from winter to spring, important information may be gathered and investigated to find clues as to what this fault may do in the future and how destructive it may be. Scientists may even be able to pinpoint when this rupture will occur. Using a resistivity meter, water content can be measured and interpreted across the fault line. Moreover, the fault itself is made visible through the data collected. This experiment deals with the collection of data across the Brigham City fault using a resistivity meter in order to provide one more piece of the puzzle to the scientific community.

Start Date

4-9-2015 1:30 PM

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Apr 9th, 1:30 PM

An Analysis of the Brigham City Fault Segment using Electrical Resistivity Tomography Techniques

Geologic faults are a result of rock structures that have given away to either tectonic compression, extension, or lateral tension. Because of their propensity to slip and cause earthquakes, they are of major concern to any populated area. The Wasatch Fault is a result of extensional stress that runs the entire length of Utah from north the south. It has been analyzed and broken up into several segments. By stratigraphic analysis, scientists have been able to estimate when each of these segments has last experienced a rupture. Out of all the segments that make up the Wasatch Fault, the Brigham City segment has not experienced movement for the longest period of time. It has been estimated that this segment will be the next segment to slip and cause an earthquake. For the safety of the Brigham City population and its surrounding cities, it is imperative that scientists continue to gather data and evaluate this hazard in order to more accurately predict when slippage will occur. If left unchecked, Brigham City, with a population of approximately 20,000 people, could be at risk for a major earthquake. Water plays a role in the mechanics of fault rupture. Water can act as a lubricant, thereby influencing when and how much slippage occurs. By comparing moisture content from winter to spring, important information may be gathered and investigated to find clues as to what this fault may do in the future and how destructive it may be. Scientists may even be able to pinpoint when this rupture will occur. Using a resistivity meter, water content can be measured and interpreted across the fault line. Moreover, the fault itself is made visible through the data collected. This experiment deals with the collection of data across the Brigham City fault using a resistivity meter in order to provide one more piece of the puzzle to the scientific community.