Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Sexual Communication in Married Couples and it's influence on Sexual and Relationship Satisfaction

Presenter Information

Adam JonesFollow

Class

Article

Department

Family, Consumer, and Human Development

Faculty Mentor

Dave Robinson

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Introduction: While there has been ample research on the positive correlation between sexual satisfaction and marital satisfaction, as well as the correlation between couple communication and sexual satisfaction, little has been done to examine the effect sexual communication has within dyadic relationships. This poster serves as the theoretical outline for a future study on how sexual communication, distinct from couples communication, correlates with sexual and relationship satisfaction. While positive couple communication has been shown to have a positive effect on sexual satisfaction and marital quality, we look at the theoretical evidence to examine sexual communication separately from couple communication. By assessing the attitudes, behaviors, topics, breadth, and depth associated with a couple's sexual communication, we will see if couples' communication about sexuality has a greater impact on sexual satisfaction than other areas of couples communication. Methods: Data will be collected through a survey of couples. The measures used will assessed marital satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, partner communication, and couple sexual communication competencies and patterns. Sexual communication will be measured by each partner rating their perceived comfort in verbally discussing the following sexual issues: use of anatomically correct phraseology, discussing sexual frequency, positive outcomes (i.e., orgasm), ability to process non-orgasm, and negotiating sexual disparities (i.e., desire, acts, and positions). Research Questions: We postulate that couples who feel comfortable in discussing sexual behaviors and desires reported higher levels of sexual and marital satisfaction. We also anticipate sexual communication to be more highly correlated with sexual satisfaction than couples communication. The application of these findings would have numerous implications for sex and couples therapy. These results would suggest a need for further research in understanding the development of healthy sexual communication as well as fostering healthy sexual communication within couples as a means to improve sexual and relationship satisfaction.

Start Date

4-9-2015 10:30 AM

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Apr 9th, 10:30 AM

Sexual Communication in Married Couples and it's influence on Sexual and Relationship Satisfaction

Introduction: While there has been ample research on the positive correlation between sexual satisfaction and marital satisfaction, as well as the correlation between couple communication and sexual satisfaction, little has been done to examine the effect sexual communication has within dyadic relationships. This poster serves as the theoretical outline for a future study on how sexual communication, distinct from couples communication, correlates with sexual and relationship satisfaction. While positive couple communication has been shown to have a positive effect on sexual satisfaction and marital quality, we look at the theoretical evidence to examine sexual communication separately from couple communication. By assessing the attitudes, behaviors, topics, breadth, and depth associated with a couple's sexual communication, we will see if couples' communication about sexuality has a greater impact on sexual satisfaction than other areas of couples communication. Methods: Data will be collected through a survey of couples. The measures used will assessed marital satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, partner communication, and couple sexual communication competencies and patterns. Sexual communication will be measured by each partner rating their perceived comfort in verbally discussing the following sexual issues: use of anatomically correct phraseology, discussing sexual frequency, positive outcomes (i.e., orgasm), ability to process non-orgasm, and negotiating sexual disparities (i.e., desire, acts, and positions). Research Questions: We postulate that couples who feel comfortable in discussing sexual behaviors and desires reported higher levels of sexual and marital satisfaction. We also anticipate sexual communication to be more highly correlated with sexual satisfaction than couples communication. The application of these findings would have numerous implications for sex and couples therapy. These results would suggest a need for further research in understanding the development of healthy sexual communication as well as fostering healthy sexual communication within couples as a means to improve sexual and relationship satisfaction.