Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

The impact of evidence-based parent education in organized youth sport: A pilot study

Presenter Information

Michael KingFollow

Class

Article

Department

Family, Consumer, and Human Development

Faculty Mentor

Travis Dorsch

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Nine in ten North American youth participate in organized sport during childhood and/or adolescence (Clark, 2010; Jellineck & Durant, 2004; USDHHS, 2010). However, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (2000, 2001), youth sport is increasingly being driven by adults and is becoming less centered on the athletes who participate. As parents continue to invest a growing percentage of family resources into the athletic development and success of their children, the "appropriate" level of parental involvement in youth sport has become a polarizing cultural debate. Although extant research illuminates developmentally appropriate parent involvement behaviors, researchers and practitioners have yet to systematically disseminate this information to parents. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to design, implement, and test an evidence-based education program for parents in organized youth sport. Parents (39 fathers and 42 mothers) from seven youth soccer teams were randomly assigned to one of three implementation conditions (full, partial, or non). At preseason, parents and athletes (41 boys and 40 girls) were administered T1 surveys. Parents (n = 18) in the full-implementation condition attended a 45-minute Parent Sport Seminar and were given the Evidence-Based Guide for Parenting in Organized Youth Sport. Parents (n = 36) in the partial-implementation condition were given the Guide. Parents (n = 27) in the non-implementation condition did not take part in the Seminar and were not given the Guide. At postseason, parents and athletes on all seven teams were administered T2 surveys. Data reveal a positive impact of the parent education program on parent and child experiences. This parent education program has the potential to enhance children's sport enjoyment and motivation, and therefore holds the potential to enhance health, positive parent-child interaction in sport and youth well-being throughout adolescence and into adulthood.

Start Date

4-9-2015 3:00 PM

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Apr 9th, 3:00 PM

The impact of evidence-based parent education in organized youth sport: A pilot study

Nine in ten North American youth participate in organized sport during childhood and/or adolescence (Clark, 2010; Jellineck & Durant, 2004; USDHHS, 2010). However, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (2000, 2001), youth sport is increasingly being driven by adults and is becoming less centered on the athletes who participate. As parents continue to invest a growing percentage of family resources into the athletic development and success of their children, the "appropriate" level of parental involvement in youth sport has become a polarizing cultural debate. Although extant research illuminates developmentally appropriate parent involvement behaviors, researchers and practitioners have yet to systematically disseminate this information to parents. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to design, implement, and test an evidence-based education program for parents in organized youth sport. Parents (39 fathers and 42 mothers) from seven youth soccer teams were randomly assigned to one of three implementation conditions (full, partial, or non). At preseason, parents and athletes (41 boys and 40 girls) were administered T1 surveys. Parents (n = 18) in the full-implementation condition attended a 45-minute Parent Sport Seminar and were given the Evidence-Based Guide for Parenting in Organized Youth Sport. Parents (n = 36) in the partial-implementation condition were given the Guide. Parents (n = 27) in the non-implementation condition did not take part in the Seminar and were not given the Guide. At postseason, parents and athletes on all seven teams were administered T2 surveys. Data reveal a positive impact of the parent education program on parent and child experiences. This parent education program has the potential to enhance children's sport enjoyment and motivation, and therefore holds the potential to enhance health, positive parent-child interaction in sport and youth well-being throughout adolescence and into adulthood.