Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Geothermal Springs: Understanding the Source of Thermal Springs, Franklin County, Idaho with geochemical tools.

Presenter Information

Shawna OlsenFollow

Class

Article

Department

Geology

Faculty Mentor

James Evans

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Thermal springs located in southeastern Idaho lies in a transition zone between a potential hidden magmatic igneous system of the Yellowstone Snake River Plain to the northeast and a Basin and Range fault system to the south of the Snake River plain (Wood et al., 2015). Both systems are a great source of heat for thermal springs. The springs that are the focus of this study consists of fifteen springs along the Bear River in Franklin County Idaho, near Cleveland. Travertine formations have created large sloping deposits and are once again creating new deposits. More importantly, this research area has springs not yet sampled due to the location of the Bear River and water levels during the runoff season. In total, fifteen geothermal springs are to be examined and sampled to identify a chemical and isotopic signature and source of heating. While gas sampling will give indications of what is driving the system, Geothermometry results will give an indication of reservoir temperatures. This data serves to improve upon the knowledge of the Idaho geothermal system and possibly help to update systems of collected data.

Start Date

4-9-2015 1:30 PM

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Apr 9th, 1:30 PM

Geothermal Springs: Understanding the Source of Thermal Springs, Franklin County, Idaho with geochemical tools.

Thermal springs located in southeastern Idaho lies in a transition zone between a potential hidden magmatic igneous system of the Yellowstone Snake River Plain to the northeast and a Basin and Range fault system to the south of the Snake River plain (Wood et al., 2015). Both systems are a great source of heat for thermal springs. The springs that are the focus of this study consists of fifteen springs along the Bear River in Franklin County Idaho, near Cleveland. Travertine formations have created large sloping deposits and are once again creating new deposits. More importantly, this research area has springs not yet sampled due to the location of the Bear River and water levels during the runoff season. In total, fifteen geothermal springs are to be examined and sampled to identify a chemical and isotopic signature and source of heating. While gas sampling will give indications of what is driving the system, Geothermometry results will give an indication of reservoir temperatures. This data serves to improve upon the knowledge of the Idaho geothermal system and possibly help to update systems of collected data.