Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Variance in stomatal size and density between triploid and diploid quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides ) in Utah

Presenter Information

Brianne PalmerFollow

Class

Article

Department

Wildland Resources

Faculty Mentor

Karen Mock

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) stands in Utah are triploid (three copies of each chromosome) or diploid (two copies of each chromosome). Their abundance in the intermountain west is declining and there may be differences in physiology between the two cytptypes. The purpose of this research is to determine whether there is a significant difference in stomatal sizes and densities between these cytotypes, which could relate to differences in drought tolerance, productivity, and effective management strategies. During the summer of 2013, we collected leaves from stands representing the two cytotypes from Swan Flats and Fish Lake in Utah. From the preliminary analyses, we deduced that the variation in stomatal size and density is primarily among clones but not among cytotypes. This is consistent with other aspects of aspen physiology found to vary by clone. To extend the study, we performed a more extensive survey of stomatal size and density. The following fall, additional leaves were collected from 20 clones in Logan and Blacksmith canyon. By increasing the sample size and including flow cytometry to confirm the cytotype we hope to eliminate a source of variation. If there is a significant difference in stomatal size and density between cytotypes, this information can lead to further research on aspen physiology and management.

Start Date

4-9-2015 9:00 AM

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Apr 9th, 9:00 AM

Variance in stomatal size and density between triploid and diploid quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides ) in Utah

Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) stands in Utah are triploid (three copies of each chromosome) or diploid (two copies of each chromosome). Their abundance in the intermountain west is declining and there may be differences in physiology between the two cytptypes. The purpose of this research is to determine whether there is a significant difference in stomatal sizes and densities between these cytotypes, which could relate to differences in drought tolerance, productivity, and effective management strategies. During the summer of 2013, we collected leaves from stands representing the two cytotypes from Swan Flats and Fish Lake in Utah. From the preliminary analyses, we deduced that the variation in stomatal size and density is primarily among clones but not among cytotypes. This is consistent with other aspects of aspen physiology found to vary by clone. To extend the study, we performed a more extensive survey of stomatal size and density. The following fall, additional leaves were collected from 20 clones in Logan and Blacksmith canyon. By increasing the sample size and including flow cytometry to confirm the cytotype we hope to eliminate a source of variation. If there is a significant difference in stomatal size and density between cytotypes, this information can lead to further research on aspen physiology and management.