Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Phasic electrodermal activity during the Standardized Assessment of Concussion

Class

Article

Department

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation

Faculty Mentor

Sydney Schaefer

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A time-effective, objective approach to determining one's neural state after concussion is electrodermal activity (EDA). Changes in EDA may provide key information about pre- and post-concussion cognitive function. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to quantify differences in electrodermal activity during a commonly-used standardized neurocognitive assessment between individuals with and without a history of concussion. METHODS: Seventeen participants (history=7; no history=10) completed the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC) while wearing bilateral wrist-worn EDA sensors. Mean phasic EDA was calculated per wrist for each SAC element. A mixed-model ANOVA was used to determine main and interaction effects for group, wrist, and test element. RESULTS: There was a significant interaction effect between test element and group. Individuals with a history of concussion had greater phasic activity during delayed recall. Delayed recall phasic activity was greater in both groups relative to the other elements. CONCLUSIONS: Delayed recall may impose greater cognitive demand on individuals with a concussion history than those without despite similar test performance. Simultaneous collection of EDA during baseline neurocognitive testing could better quantify a pre-concussive state to which post-concussion tests could be compared for more informed return to work, school, or activity decisions.

Start Date

4-9-2015 11:00 AM

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Apr 9th, 11:00 AM

Phasic electrodermal activity during the Standardized Assessment of Concussion

BACKGROUND: A time-effective, objective approach to determining one's neural state after concussion is electrodermal activity (EDA). Changes in EDA may provide key information about pre- and post-concussion cognitive function. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to quantify differences in electrodermal activity during a commonly-used standardized neurocognitive assessment between individuals with and without a history of concussion. METHODS: Seventeen participants (history=7; no history=10) completed the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC) while wearing bilateral wrist-worn EDA sensors. Mean phasic EDA was calculated per wrist for each SAC element. A mixed-model ANOVA was used to determine main and interaction effects for group, wrist, and test element. RESULTS: There was a significant interaction effect between test element and group. Individuals with a history of concussion had greater phasic activity during delayed recall. Delayed recall phasic activity was greater in both groups relative to the other elements. CONCLUSIONS: Delayed recall may impose greater cognitive demand on individuals with a concussion history than those without despite similar test performance. Simultaneous collection of EDA during baseline neurocognitive testing could better quantify a pre-concussive state to which post-concussion tests could be compared for more informed return to work, school, or activity decisions.