Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

An Evaluation of Photographic Activity Schedules to Increase Independent Playground Skills in Young Children with Autism

Class

Article

Department

Special Education and Rehabilitation

Faculty Mentor

Thomas Higbee

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Children with autism have difficulty learning to play appropriately due to their deficits with social skills and their excessive engagement in repetitive behaviors. Photographic activity schedules have been used to teach children with autism to independently complete a sequence of activities. Activity schedules may be an effective method to teach appropriate play on the playground since many children with autism engage in repetitive play or self-stimulatory behavior during recess instead of completing a variety of playground activities. The three participants in this study all began engaging in more playground activities when activity schedules were introduced. They continued completing more activities when novel activities were introduced and at the 2-week follow up sessions. When the schedules were removed participants' responding removed to baseline levels.

Start Date

4-9-2015 11:00 AM

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Apr 9th, 11:00 AM

An Evaluation of Photographic Activity Schedules to Increase Independent Playground Skills in Young Children with Autism

Children with autism have difficulty learning to play appropriately due to their deficits with social skills and their excessive engagement in repetitive behaviors. Photographic activity schedules have been used to teach children with autism to independently complete a sequence of activities. Activity schedules may be an effective method to teach appropriate play on the playground since many children with autism engage in repetitive play or self-stimulatory behavior during recess instead of completing a variety of playground activities. The three participants in this study all began engaging in more playground activities when activity schedules were introduced. They continued completing more activities when novel activities were introduced and at the 2-week follow up sessions. When the schedules were removed participants' responding removed to baseline levels.