Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Electric Vehicle Battery Balancing Real-Time Controller Implementation Based on Hardware-in-the-Loop and Simulink Real-Time

Class

Article

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Faculty Mentor

Regan Zane

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Active-balancing systems for large battery packs employ a central-control to perform higher level safety and control objectives. This presentation presents an implementation of a central-control system with high control loop rate, low cost and short developing time based on combining Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) and Simulink Real-Time. This approach allows development of a real-time control system using existing hardware plant without requirements of additional programming ability and computationally powerful DSP or ECU, which is both cost and time effective. The system includes a host computer, target PC and HIL. The host computer allows development of control system model, running simulations, generating executable real-time code, and visualizing results. The target PC is a standard commercial PC without any operation system requirements except a BIOS, and it runs the real-time control system. The HIL is a combination of cell-balancing hardware, a shared low voltage bus, and cell-level controller which regulates balancing current according to bus voltage reference sent from real-time control system. The real-time control system, running on target PC, receives cell voltage, cell current and cell temperature data from HIL via DAQ cards, estimates the state-of-charge (SOC) of each cell using a sigma-point Kalman filter, then calculates bus voltage reference for each cell according to control objectives. The presentation also discusses challenges of developing the real-time control system model in Simulink. Experimental results are presented for a HIL consisting twenty-one series 25 Ah Panasonic Lithium Polymer battery cells and twenty-one DAB bypass converters, with combined outputs rated to supply a 14 V, 650 W auxiliary load. A target PC with 3.4 GHz Pentium 4 processor, 1GB RAM, and 160 GB hard disk is used.

Start Date

4-9-2015 1:00 PM

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM

Electric Vehicle Battery Balancing Real-Time Controller Implementation Based on Hardware-in-the-Loop and Simulink Real-Time

Active-balancing systems for large battery packs employ a central-control to perform higher level safety and control objectives. This presentation presents an implementation of a central-control system with high control loop rate, low cost and short developing time based on combining Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) and Simulink Real-Time. This approach allows development of a real-time control system using existing hardware plant without requirements of additional programming ability and computationally powerful DSP or ECU, which is both cost and time effective. The system includes a host computer, target PC and HIL. The host computer allows development of control system model, running simulations, generating executable real-time code, and visualizing results. The target PC is a standard commercial PC without any operation system requirements except a BIOS, and it runs the real-time control system. The HIL is a combination of cell-balancing hardware, a shared low voltage bus, and cell-level controller which regulates balancing current according to bus voltage reference sent from real-time control system. The real-time control system, running on target PC, receives cell voltage, cell current and cell temperature data from HIL via DAQ cards, estimates the state-of-charge (SOC) of each cell using a sigma-point Kalman filter, then calculates bus voltage reference for each cell according to control objectives. The presentation also discusses challenges of developing the real-time control system model in Simulink. Experimental results are presented for a HIL consisting twenty-one series 25 Ah Panasonic Lithium Polymer battery cells and twenty-one DAB bypass converters, with combined outputs rated to supply a 14 V, 650 W auxiliary load. A target PC with 3.4 GHz Pentium 4 processor, 1GB RAM, and 160 GB hard disk is used.