Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Developing in Silico Model to Study The Effect of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Patch Size

Class

Article

Department

Computer Science

Faculty Mentor

Nicholas Flann

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Developing in silico model for micropatterning technique provides a model for replicating disease state in Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), so as to gain new insights on disease progression and outcomes. It can be used to replicate the effect of atrophic and leaky Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE) cells on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) expression. We have developed a computational model to investigate the VEGF regulation and distribution in different patches size. Here, we combined quantitative experimental and mathematical modeling approaches to study the effect of patch size on VEGF expression. In this study, we monitor the spatial distribution of VEGF in the different patches. We can use such distribution to study the effect of VEGF distribution in the disease progression.

Start Date

4-9-2015 3:00 PM

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Apr 9th, 3:00 PM

Developing in Silico Model to Study The Effect of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Patch Size

Developing in silico model for micropatterning technique provides a model for replicating disease state in Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), so as to gain new insights on disease progression and outcomes. It can be used to replicate the effect of atrophic and leaky Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE) cells on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) expression. We have developed a computational model to investigate the VEGF regulation and distribution in different patches size. Here, we combined quantitative experimental and mathematical modeling approaches to study the effect of patch size on VEGF expression. In this study, we monitor the spatial distribution of VEGF in the different patches. We can use such distribution to study the effect of VEGF distribution in the disease progression.