Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Guinavah-Malibu Redesign

Class

Article

Department

Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning

Faculty Mentor

Ole Sleipness

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Guinavah-Malibu campground is one of many beautiful campgrounds in Logan Canyon. Only a few miles from Logan, the campground is easily accessible and a convenient location for outdoor recreation. In an effort to create a long-term sustainable and user-friendly area, a new campground design is being proposed. The new design will accommodate a variety of uses, as well as attempt to separate day-use from overnight camping. There are several problems with the current condition of the campground which are resolved through the proposed design. Preserving the historic elements of the site, improving the sustainability of the amphitheater, improving circulation, separating uses, and dealing with vegetation problems were the main foci behind this design. Making the amphitheater sustainable, and including a 'day-use only' area east of the river, will be one aspect crucial to the success of this design. Outlined on another sheet is found a list of ideas for using and sustaining the amphitheater and surrounding area. Providing a day use recreation area will bring more people to the site, and increase activity of the surrounding trails and amenities. In addition to the multi-purpose recreation areas, a riverwalk through riparian vegetation creates a valuable aesthetic, and more private experience for the campground users to enjoy. Although the current vehicular circulation has been semi-successful for many years, the new proposed circulation will greatly improve navigation of the site, as well as allow for easier management of campsites and other recreation areas. The crack willow trees which are found throughout the Guinavah Malibu campground are valuable to creating an enclosed camping experience. However, the trees are old and dying. It is important to maintain the same enclosed feeling of the site, while safely managing the old trees. The crack will help with soil erosion and need to be phased out over time. Use cottonwood, boxelder, dogwood, and sumac while replanting. These plants will thrive in these conditions and will help to maintain the soil. The new design includes 53 campsites, three group sites and two host sites, better circulation, separation of uses, and ideas for sustaining the amphitheater.

Start Date

4-9-2015 9:00 AM

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Apr 9th, 9:00 AM

Guinavah-Malibu Redesign

Guinavah-Malibu campground is one of many beautiful campgrounds in Logan Canyon. Only a few miles from Logan, the campground is easily accessible and a convenient location for outdoor recreation. In an effort to create a long-term sustainable and user-friendly area, a new campground design is being proposed. The new design will accommodate a variety of uses, as well as attempt to separate day-use from overnight camping. There are several problems with the current condition of the campground which are resolved through the proposed design. Preserving the historic elements of the site, improving the sustainability of the amphitheater, improving circulation, separating uses, and dealing with vegetation problems were the main foci behind this design. Making the amphitheater sustainable, and including a 'day-use only' area east of the river, will be one aspect crucial to the success of this design. Outlined on another sheet is found a list of ideas for using and sustaining the amphitheater and surrounding area. Providing a day use recreation area will bring more people to the site, and increase activity of the surrounding trails and amenities. In addition to the multi-purpose recreation areas, a riverwalk through riparian vegetation creates a valuable aesthetic, and more private experience for the campground users to enjoy. Although the current vehicular circulation has been semi-successful for many years, the new proposed circulation will greatly improve navigation of the site, as well as allow for easier management of campsites and other recreation areas. The crack willow trees which are found throughout the Guinavah Malibu campground are valuable to creating an enclosed camping experience. However, the trees are old and dying. It is important to maintain the same enclosed feeling of the site, while safely managing the old trees. The crack will help with soil erosion and need to be phased out over time. Use cottonwood, boxelder, dogwood, and sumac while replanting. These plants will thrive in these conditions and will help to maintain the soil. The new design includes 53 campsites, three group sites and two host sites, better circulation, separation of uses, and ideas for sustaining the amphitheater.