Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Exploring the Diversity-Productivity Relationship

Presenter Information

Leslie ForeroFollow

Class

Article

Department

Wildland Resources

Faculty Mentor

Andrew Kulmatiski

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Polycultures tend to be more productive than monocultures. For example, experimental plots with 16-species communities are capable of producing twice as much biomass as monocultures. Our research seeks to explore this phenomenon by examining plant-soil feedbacks as a factor in the diversity-productivity relationship. Our goals with this research are to: 1. Measure plant-soil feedbacks on several sites which have a history of diversity-productivity studies. 2. Use our plant-soil feedback measurements in conjunction with diversity-productivity measurements to model plant productivity and to test plant-soil feedback effects. 3. Use next-generation genetic techniques to describe the soil microbes and fungi associated with each plant species.

Start Date

4-9-2015 3:00 PM

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Apr 9th, 3:00 PM

Exploring the Diversity-Productivity Relationship

Polycultures tend to be more productive than monocultures. For example, experimental plots with 16-species communities are capable of producing twice as much biomass as monocultures. Our research seeks to explore this phenomenon by examining plant-soil feedbacks as a factor in the diversity-productivity relationship. Our goals with this research are to: 1. Measure plant-soil feedbacks on several sites which have a history of diversity-productivity studies. 2. Use our plant-soil feedback measurements in conjunction with diversity-productivity measurements to model plant productivity and to test plant-soil feedback effects. 3. Use next-generation genetic techniques to describe the soil microbes and fungi associated with each plant species.