Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

#GenderRoles: Modeling Gender Among LDS Students

Class

Article

Department

Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology

Faculty Mentor

Francois Dengah

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Cultural consensus has emerged as an important way of teaching mixed ethnographic methods to future generations of anthropologists. A major strength of cultural consensus as a pedagogical tool is its intuitive logic and straight forward procedure. This paper demonstrates the use of this method as an entry point into anthropological fieldwork about religious gender roles. The collaborative efforts of Utah State University student-researchers show how junior researchers can use this approach to document the consensus and contestation of ideal gender roles of Mormon college students. Research methods included both semi-structured "free-list" interviews and pile-sorts to determine this cultural consensus model of ideal LDS and American gender roles among college students. Findings indicate a high level of consensus for both LDS male and female gender roles, and American male gender roles. However, there is low cultural consensus on the American female gender role. Further research will look at how college students' health is impacted by conformity/non-conformity to these gender roles.

Start Date

4-9-2015 9:00 AM

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Apr 9th, 9:00 AM

#GenderRoles: Modeling Gender Among LDS Students

Cultural consensus has emerged as an important way of teaching mixed ethnographic methods to future generations of anthropologists. A major strength of cultural consensus as a pedagogical tool is its intuitive logic and straight forward procedure. This paper demonstrates the use of this method as an entry point into anthropological fieldwork about religious gender roles. The collaborative efforts of Utah State University student-researchers show how junior researchers can use this approach to document the consensus and contestation of ideal gender roles of Mormon college students. Research methods included both semi-structured "free-list" interviews and pile-sorts to determine this cultural consensus model of ideal LDS and American gender roles among college students. Findings indicate a high level of consensus for both LDS male and female gender roles, and American male gender roles. However, there is low cultural consensus on the American female gender role. Further research will look at how college students' health is impacted by conformity/non-conformity to these gender roles.