Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

The Relationship Between Narrative Proficiency and Syntactic Complexity of Spontaneously Generated Stories Elicited from Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

Presenter Information

Megan IsraelsenFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2018

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education Department

Faculty Mentor

Sandi Gillam

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Purpose:

Complex syntax is important for the development of syntactically complex, coherent and logically constructed narratives. Narrative discourse is a means for communicating perceptions, feelings, values and attitudes within cultural contexts. The ability to produce coherent and cohesive narratives has been linked to competence in socialization, working memory and academics. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) vary widely in terms of their mastery of complex syntax and often demonstrate difficulty with narrative comprehension and production.

The purpose of this study was to examine the syntactic complexity of spontaneously generated stories of 5 children ranging in age from 8-12 with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) before, during and after narrative intervention.

Method: Children participated in narrative intervention for 45 minutes, twice weekly for a period of time ranging from 19 to 33 sessions.

Results: Results indicated that during baseline when children were not receiving instruction, their story retells contained more simple sentences than complex sentences. The use of complex sentences was observed to increase as children became more proficient in their narrative production skills.

Discussion: Students generally improved on narrative discourse skills as a result of participating in the narrative intervention. The implications for clinicians working with students with ASD are compelling and suggest that narrative intervention may be associated with the additional benefit of improved complex sentence use.

Location

Room 204

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

The Relationship Between Narrative Proficiency and Syntactic Complexity of Spontaneously Generated Stories Elicited from Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

Room 204

Purpose:

Complex syntax is important for the development of syntactically complex, coherent and logically constructed narratives. Narrative discourse is a means for communicating perceptions, feelings, values and attitudes within cultural contexts. The ability to produce coherent and cohesive narratives has been linked to competence in socialization, working memory and academics. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) vary widely in terms of their mastery of complex syntax and often demonstrate difficulty with narrative comprehension and production.

The purpose of this study was to examine the syntactic complexity of spontaneously generated stories of 5 children ranging in age from 8-12 with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) before, during and after narrative intervention.

Method: Children participated in narrative intervention for 45 minutes, twice weekly for a period of time ranging from 19 to 33 sessions.

Results: Results indicated that during baseline when children were not receiving instruction, their story retells contained more simple sentences than complex sentences. The use of complex sentences was observed to increase as children became more proficient in their narrative production skills.

Discussion: Students generally improved on narrative discourse skills as a result of participating in the narrative intervention. The implications for clinicians working with students with ASD are compelling and suggest that narrative intervention may be associated with the additional benefit of improved complex sentence use.