Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Innovative Delivery of a Marriage Enrichment Workshop

Presenter Information

Latrisha FallFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Family, Consumer, and Human Development Department

Faculty Mentor

David Law

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

When we think of “enhancing the human condition” we envision people with superpowers. We look at the vast world of human services, discover a problem, zone in and ask ourselves, “What can we do to solve this?” The Marriage Enrichment Workshop strengthens the family unit one marriage at a time. As undergraduate students involved in the workshop we have uncovered that equipping couples with tools to strengthen their marriage is the best superpower you can give to a family.

The Marriage Enrichment Workshop (MEW) is a capstone of the FHCD 5540: Family Life Education Methods class teaches students how to design a workshop through hands-on facilitation of a workshop offered to rural couples. The materials for the class and workshop are based on the highly effective methods of Dr. John Gottman’s The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work, Dr. Willard Harley’s His Needs, Her Needs, Lane H. Powell’s Family Life Education: Working with Families across the Life Span, and Love, Limits, and Latitude: A Thousand Small Moments of Parenting by M. Gawain Wells, David Law, and Jennifer E. Johnson. The semester is divided into two sessions, the first six weeks are students receive in-class instruction and feedback from the instructor to help develop their material to be presented to the couples. The last six weeks of the course is the workshop. The workshop is designed to increase marital satisfaction by helping spouses learn to meet each other’s needs and practice effective communication.

Research indicates that satisfaction with sexual communication was significantly and positively associated with sexual satisfaction, dyadic adjustment, dyadic satisfaction, dyadic cohesion, affectional expression and dyadic consensus (Cupach, 1990). We experienced positive feedback when we discussed sexual fulfillment, a key component to any marriage yet is often left out of the discussions about strengthening marriages.

Location

Room 204

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Innovative Delivery of a Marriage Enrichment Workshop

Room 204

When we think of “enhancing the human condition” we envision people with superpowers. We look at the vast world of human services, discover a problem, zone in and ask ourselves, “What can we do to solve this?” The Marriage Enrichment Workshop strengthens the family unit one marriage at a time. As undergraduate students involved in the workshop we have uncovered that equipping couples with tools to strengthen their marriage is the best superpower you can give to a family.

The Marriage Enrichment Workshop (MEW) is a capstone of the FHCD 5540: Family Life Education Methods class teaches students how to design a workshop through hands-on facilitation of a workshop offered to rural couples. The materials for the class and workshop are based on the highly effective methods of Dr. John Gottman’s The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work, Dr. Willard Harley’s His Needs, Her Needs, Lane H. Powell’s Family Life Education: Working with Families across the Life Span, and Love, Limits, and Latitude: A Thousand Small Moments of Parenting by M. Gawain Wells, David Law, and Jennifer E. Johnson. The semester is divided into two sessions, the first six weeks are students receive in-class instruction and feedback from the instructor to help develop their material to be presented to the couples. The last six weeks of the course is the workshop. The workshop is designed to increase marital satisfaction by helping spouses learn to meet each other’s needs and practice effective communication.

Research indicates that satisfaction with sexual communication was significantly and positively associated with sexual satisfaction, dyadic adjustment, dyadic satisfaction, dyadic cohesion, affectional expression and dyadic consensus (Cupach, 1990). We experienced positive feedback when we discussed sexual fulfillment, a key component to any marriage yet is often left out of the discussions about strengthening marriages.