Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Reduction of Radiation Effects in Polymers

Presenter Information

Alexandra HughlettFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2021

College

College of Science

Department

Physics Department

Faculty Mentor

Dr. JR Dennison

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Samples of polyimide, polypropylene (PP), low density polyethylene (LDPE), and fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) were exposed to 500 MGy of radiation from an 8MeV electron accelerator. These dosages were intended to mimic the radiation exposure of spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit. This radiation can create atomic scale defect states within the molecular bonds in these polymers and change their basic mechanical, electrical, and optical properties. Recent work has suggested that previously identified defect states are sensitive to atmospheric exposure (more specific oxygen and water) and these defect states will recover and eventually vanish with time. Failure to consider and characterize such recovery, can create inaccuracies in radiation damage studies, and has called into question previous work studying the effects of radiation on spacecraft materials. In order to better understand the relaxation of these defect states, optical-transmission spectra were taken at intervals after atmospheric exposure. They were then compared with each other to evaluate the effects of atmospheric exposure and time, on the polymers defect states.

Location

Room 155

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Reduction of Radiation Effects in Polymers

Room 155

Samples of polyimide, polypropylene (PP), low density polyethylene (LDPE), and fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) were exposed to 500 MGy of radiation from an 8MeV electron accelerator. These dosages were intended to mimic the radiation exposure of spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit. This radiation can create atomic scale defect states within the molecular bonds in these polymers and change their basic mechanical, electrical, and optical properties. Recent work has suggested that previously identified defect states are sensitive to atmospheric exposure (more specific oxygen and water) and these defect states will recover and eventually vanish with time. Failure to consider and characterize such recovery, can create inaccuracies in radiation damage studies, and has called into question previous work studying the effects of radiation on spacecraft materials. In order to better understand the relaxation of these defect states, optical-transmission spectra were taken at intervals after atmospheric exposure. They were then compared with each other to evaluate the effects of atmospheric exposure and time, on the polymers defect states.