Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Testing the accuracy of determining sex from the calcaneus, talus, and metacarpals on individuals of known sex

Presenter Information

Katlyn CasagrandeFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology Department

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Pat Lambert

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Forensic Anthropologists and Bioarcheologists are often called upon to determine the sex of human skeletal remains. The most common method of sex determination involves the os coxae, followed by the skull and femur as the most often used elements when the os coxae is missing or incomplete. However, due to predation and decay, the ossa coxae, skull, and femurs are often gone by the time anthropologists study the remains. As such, it has become increasingly important to develop other methods of sex estimation based on elements that preserve better. This research focuses sex determination using measurements of hand and foot bones- specifically the metacarpals, calcaneus, and talus- as these small, dense bones preserve well and have been used for this purpose with some degree of success in the past. In order to determine the accuracy for estimating sex, measurements were taken from 110 individuals identified as ethnically “black” and “white” in the William M Bass Donated Skeletal Collection located at the University of Tennessee. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine which, if any,of these bones provided an accurate estimation of sex and to identify which measurements were most useful. The results of this study offer a better understanding of sexual dimorphism in the size and shape of metacarpals, calcanei, and tali, and offer new insights for using these skeletal elements for estimating sex in skeletonized human remains.

Location

Room 421

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Testing the accuracy of determining sex from the calcaneus, talus, and metacarpals on individuals of known sex

Room 421

Forensic Anthropologists and Bioarcheologists are often called upon to determine the sex of human skeletal remains. The most common method of sex determination involves the os coxae, followed by the skull and femur as the most often used elements when the os coxae is missing or incomplete. However, due to predation and decay, the ossa coxae, skull, and femurs are often gone by the time anthropologists study the remains. As such, it has become increasingly important to develop other methods of sex estimation based on elements that preserve better. This research focuses sex determination using measurements of hand and foot bones- specifically the metacarpals, calcaneus, and talus- as these small, dense bones preserve well and have been used for this purpose with some degree of success in the past. In order to determine the accuracy for estimating sex, measurements were taken from 110 individuals identified as ethnically “black” and “white” in the William M Bass Donated Skeletal Collection located at the University of Tennessee. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine which, if any,of these bones provided an accurate estimation of sex and to identify which measurements were most useful. The results of this study offer a better understanding of sexual dimorphism in the size and shape of metacarpals, calcanei, and tali, and offer new insights for using these skeletal elements for estimating sex in skeletonized human remains.