Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Leaning In or Opting Out? Analying Gender Differences in Career Aspirations Over Time

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2019

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology Department

Faculty Mentor

Christy Glass

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Observed gender differences in career attainment lead many observers to conclude that women and men differ in terms of career and family aspirations. Yet recent national data suggest that career and family-based attitudinal differences between men and women are shrinking, particularly among younger generations. This study asks whether men and women nearing college graduation hold different career goals, and whether these differences change over time as graduates form families and enter careers. We focus our analysis on Utah, a culturally conservative state that ranks last in terms of women’s professional advancement. By analyzing and tracking gender differences in career goals, we hope to better understand the factors that shape women’s career trajectories and contribute to gender differences in career attainment over time. Our analysis will be based on a longitudinal survey of graduating Honors students at a large R1 university. Wave 1 will include a sample of graduating seniors who are members of the Honors Program. Wave 2 will include the same sample one year later; and Wave 3 will include the sample two years following graduation. Survey data will be supplemented by in-depth interviews with a sample of survey respondents at each wave.

Location

Room 154

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Leaning In or Opting Out? Analying Gender Differences in Career Aspirations Over Time

Room 154

Observed gender differences in career attainment lead many observers to conclude that women and men differ in terms of career and family aspirations. Yet recent national data suggest that career and family-based attitudinal differences between men and women are shrinking, particularly among younger generations. This study asks whether men and women nearing college graduation hold different career goals, and whether these differences change over time as graduates form families and enter careers. We focus our analysis on Utah, a culturally conservative state that ranks last in terms of women’s professional advancement. By analyzing and tracking gender differences in career goals, we hope to better understand the factors that shape women’s career trajectories and contribute to gender differences in career attainment over time. Our analysis will be based on a longitudinal survey of graduating Honors students at a large R1 university. Wave 1 will include a sample of graduating seniors who are members of the Honors Program. Wave 2 will include the same sample one year later; and Wave 3 will include the sample two years following graduation. Survey data will be supplemented by in-depth interviews with a sample of survey respondents at each wave.