Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Gender’s Impact on Mental Health Help Seeking in Utah

Presenter Information

Erin JensenFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2018

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology Department

Faculty Mentor

Jessica Lucero

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Throughout this school year, junior level social work students have worked in partnership with various Mental Health Stakeholders and Agencies across Utah to develop and conduct a general public, statewide survey examining the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences related to mental health. Specifically, we examine how perceived barriers to mental health access and help-seeking might vary by gender. Research shows men and women respond to mental health concerns differently. Women are more likely to seek help from a mental health professional than men (Rhodes, Goering, To, & Williams, 2002). According to Slaunwhite (2015), women are more likely to cite a lack of childcare or transportation as keeping them from seeking help, while men tend to be kept away from seeking help by their perceptions of the usefulness of such services. This study augments the literature by examining these issues in a Utah context.

Surveys were administered door-to-door in Logan, Brigham City, Price, Tooele, and Blanding, as well as online through social media and community and religious organization outreach throughout the state. The final sample size will consist of approximately 2,000 Utah residents aged 18 or older. The data from this study will be analyzed using SPSS statistical software. This presentation will examine and analyze how help-seeking behaviors and perceived barriers to accessing mental health services in Utah are affected by gender, and will propose ways in which this information can be used to inform mental health agencies throughout the state.

Rhodes, A. E., Goering, P. N., To, T., & Williams, J. I. (2002). Gender and outpatient mental health service use. Social Science & Medicine, 54(1), 1-10.

Slaunwhite, A. K. (2015). The role of gender and income in predicting barriers to mental health care in Canada. Community Mental Health Journal, 51(5), 621-627.

Location

Room 154

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Gender’s Impact on Mental Health Help Seeking in Utah

Room 154

Throughout this school year, junior level social work students have worked in partnership with various Mental Health Stakeholders and Agencies across Utah to develop and conduct a general public, statewide survey examining the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences related to mental health. Specifically, we examine how perceived barriers to mental health access and help-seeking might vary by gender. Research shows men and women respond to mental health concerns differently. Women are more likely to seek help from a mental health professional than men (Rhodes, Goering, To, & Williams, 2002). According to Slaunwhite (2015), women are more likely to cite a lack of childcare or transportation as keeping them from seeking help, while men tend to be kept away from seeking help by their perceptions of the usefulness of such services. This study augments the literature by examining these issues in a Utah context.

Surveys were administered door-to-door in Logan, Brigham City, Price, Tooele, and Blanding, as well as online through social media and community and religious organization outreach throughout the state. The final sample size will consist of approximately 2,000 Utah residents aged 18 or older. The data from this study will be analyzed using SPSS statistical software. This presentation will examine and analyze how help-seeking behaviors and perceived barriers to accessing mental health services in Utah are affected by gender, and will propose ways in which this information can be used to inform mental health agencies throughout the state.

Rhodes, A. E., Goering, P. N., To, T., & Williams, J. I. (2002). Gender and outpatient mental health service use. Social Science & Medicine, 54(1), 1-10.

Slaunwhite, A. K. (2015). The role of gender and income in predicting barriers to mental health care in Canada. Community Mental Health Journal, 51(5), 621-627.