Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Impact of Thermally Abused Oil on Gut Inflammation and Colon Tumorigenesis in Mice Fed Standard Diet or the Total Western Diet

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2018

College

College of Science

Department

Chemistry and Biochemistry Department

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Abby Benninghoff

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

IMPACT OF THERMALLY ABUSED OIL ON GUT INFLAMMATION AND COLON TUMORIGENESIS IN MICE FED STANDARD DIET OR THE TOTAL WESTERN DIET

Rachelle Boomen1, Emily Speas1, Kimberly Campbell1, Sumira Phatak1, Canyon Neal1, Tess Armbrust1, Kevin Contreras1, Daphne Rodriguez1, Takayuki Yasui1, Forest Eddy1, Michaela Brubaker1, Kristina Krepinski1, Elizabeth Park1,William Helferich1, Korry J. Hintze2,3, Abby D. Benninghoff1,3

1 Department of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322

2 Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322

3 USTAR Applied Nutrition Research, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322

A Western type diet is characterized by highly processed foods that are energy-dense, yet nutrient-poor. Deep frying of these foods results in the formation of several toxic compounds known to negatively influence health outcome, including increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Previous studies showed that consumption thermally abused oil (TAO) damaged gut lining and altered microbiota composition in rats, although body weight was unaffected. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of the total Western diet (TWD) for rodents, prepared with either fresh oil or TAO, on health endpoints associated with chronic inflammation and CRC. We hypothesized that dietary exposure to TAO would increase gut inflammation and promote colon tumorigenesis as compared to diets prepared with fresh oil. The azoxymethane + dextran sodium sulfate model of inflammation-associated CRC was used with a 2x2 experiment design, where mice were fed either standard AIN93G or the TWD, each prepared with either fresh oil or TAO. Endpoints assessed included colon tumors, symptoms of colitis, energy and food intake, body and fat mass gain, colon length, cecum weight, and organ weights. AIN93G+TAO did not significantly impact any of the measured parameters as compared to AIN93G+fresh oil. Energy intake in mice provided TWD+TAO was significantly greater than observed in mice fed TAO+fresh oil, however this change did not translate to increased body weight or fat mass gain. Also, exposure to TAO did not significantly increase symptoms of colitis in mice fed either basal diet. As colitis is a major contributor to colon tumorigenesis, we expect to observe a similar pattern with respect to colon tumor multiplicity and burden (analysis in process). Overall, these results suggest that exposure to TAO via either a standard basal diet or a Western type had little impact on health status in mice.

Location

North Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Impact of Thermally Abused Oil on Gut Inflammation and Colon Tumorigenesis in Mice Fed Standard Diet or the Total Western Diet

North Atrium

IMPACT OF THERMALLY ABUSED OIL ON GUT INFLAMMATION AND COLON TUMORIGENESIS IN MICE FED STANDARD DIET OR THE TOTAL WESTERN DIET

Rachelle Boomen1, Emily Speas1, Kimberly Campbell1, Sumira Phatak1, Canyon Neal1, Tess Armbrust1, Kevin Contreras1, Daphne Rodriguez1, Takayuki Yasui1, Forest Eddy1, Michaela Brubaker1, Kristina Krepinski1, Elizabeth Park1,William Helferich1, Korry J. Hintze2,3, Abby D. Benninghoff1,3

1 Department of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322

2 Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322

3 USTAR Applied Nutrition Research, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322

A Western type diet is characterized by highly processed foods that are energy-dense, yet nutrient-poor. Deep frying of these foods results in the formation of several toxic compounds known to negatively influence health outcome, including increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Previous studies showed that consumption thermally abused oil (TAO) damaged gut lining and altered microbiota composition in rats, although body weight was unaffected. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of the total Western diet (TWD) for rodents, prepared with either fresh oil or TAO, on health endpoints associated with chronic inflammation and CRC. We hypothesized that dietary exposure to TAO would increase gut inflammation and promote colon tumorigenesis as compared to diets prepared with fresh oil. The azoxymethane + dextran sodium sulfate model of inflammation-associated CRC was used with a 2x2 experiment design, where mice were fed either standard AIN93G or the TWD, each prepared with either fresh oil or TAO. Endpoints assessed included colon tumors, symptoms of colitis, energy and food intake, body and fat mass gain, colon length, cecum weight, and organ weights. AIN93G+TAO did not significantly impact any of the measured parameters as compared to AIN93G+fresh oil. Energy intake in mice provided TWD+TAO was significantly greater than observed in mice fed TAO+fresh oil, however this change did not translate to increased body weight or fat mass gain. Also, exposure to TAO did not significantly increase symptoms of colitis in mice fed either basal diet. As colitis is a major contributor to colon tumorigenesis, we expect to observe a similar pattern with respect to colon tumor multiplicity and burden (analysis in process). Overall, these results suggest that exposure to TAO via either a standard basal diet or a Western type had little impact on health status in mice.