Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Design of In-Flight Instrumentation to Characterze a Hybrid Thruster

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2018

College

College of Engineering

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department

Faculty Mentor

Stephen Whitmore

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Utah State has developed an innovative design for a hybrid thruster to be used in small satellite applications. This is a “green” thruster designed and is significantly cheaper and safer to implement than industry standards. In order for this thruster to be utilized on missions the TRL (Technology Readiness Level) must be improved. An in-flight space test is required to improve the TRL. This testing will be accomplished through NASA USIP project, where NASA will provide a Terrier-Malemute rocket to expose the final design to the space environment. The final instrumentation design falls into two primary categories. The first aspect of the design instrumentation is the firing system of the thruster. The firing system must meet all NASA safety requirements and demonstrate multiple restart capability in vacuum conditions. The NASA USIP project will have multiple other projects being sent on the same rocket. The thruster geometry is designed to be self-nulling, so that no moment will be imparted onto the rocket and interfere with other projects. The second aspect of the design instrumentation is a series of sensors and corresponding electrical systems to characterize the contamination created from the plume of the thruster. Photometer readings over time show the feasibility of using optical equipment near the thruster. On ground testing of plume contamination is examined with both traditional and scanning electron microscopes to characterize the size and elemental composition of the plume exhaust, and to correlate this contamination with a decrease in transmittance through optical systems. All systems are designed to withstand vibration on launch, as well as a water recovery after reentry.

Location

North Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 1:15 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 12:00 PM Apr 13th, 1:15 PM

Design of In-Flight Instrumentation to Characterze a Hybrid Thruster

North Atrium

Utah State has developed an innovative design for a hybrid thruster to be used in small satellite applications. This is a “green” thruster designed and is significantly cheaper and safer to implement than industry standards. In order for this thruster to be utilized on missions the TRL (Technology Readiness Level) must be improved. An in-flight space test is required to improve the TRL. This testing will be accomplished through NASA USIP project, where NASA will provide a Terrier-Malemute rocket to expose the final design to the space environment. The final instrumentation design falls into two primary categories. The first aspect of the design instrumentation is the firing system of the thruster. The firing system must meet all NASA safety requirements and demonstrate multiple restart capability in vacuum conditions. The NASA USIP project will have multiple other projects being sent on the same rocket. The thruster geometry is designed to be self-nulling, so that no moment will be imparted onto the rocket and interfere with other projects. The second aspect of the design instrumentation is a series of sensors and corresponding electrical systems to characterize the contamination created from the plume of the thruster. Photometer readings over time show the feasibility of using optical equipment near the thruster. On ground testing of plume contamination is examined with both traditional and scanning electron microscopes to characterize the size and elemental composition of the plume exhaust, and to correlate this contamination with a decrease in transmittance through optical systems. All systems are designed to withstand vibration on launch, as well as a water recovery after reentry.