Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

“Because it was cheap, because it was on sale”: Essential nutrient intake at USU

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2019

College

College of Science

Department

Biology Department

Faculty Mentor

Michelle Grocke

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

The “freshman 15” is common folklore on college campuses. So too is the understanding that ramen and pizza are the breakfast, lunch, and dinner of champions and that Mountain Dew with a shot of Monster is the elixir of life. In this poster, we will seek to identify in what ways essential nutrient intake differs between college classes (e.g. freshmen, sophomores, etc.) at Utah State University, focusing specifically on water soluble vitamins. We used a convenient snowballing sample to conduct a 24 hour food recall with 5-8 participants per college class. Additionally, each interview included basic demographic information that we believed could impact nutritional intake: Employment status, income, gender, residency (on or off campus), meal plan, marital status, number of children, religious identity, transportation access, and the number of credits that each participant is currently taking, as well as height, weight, and age. Water soluble vitamins are constantly flushed from the body, thus they need to be replaced daily. For this reason, students should be eating foods that contain these vitamins every day. We utilized the USDA Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies (FNDDS) dataset to calculate water-soluable vitamin values for each participant based upon their 24 hour diet recalls. We then entered these values into SPSS and compared to see whether they differed significantly from the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for each participant’s age and gender. Where RDA values are not available we used adequate intake (AI) values. Because participant observation is an integral part of any anthropological study, we also accompanied and observed participants when they went to the grocery store, to understand what factors went into choosing foods.

Location

South Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 1:15 PM

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Apr 13th, 12:00 PM Apr 13th, 1:15 PM

“Because it was cheap, because it was on sale”: Essential nutrient intake at USU

South Atrium

The “freshman 15” is common folklore on college campuses. So too is the understanding that ramen and pizza are the breakfast, lunch, and dinner of champions and that Mountain Dew with a shot of Monster is the elixir of life. In this poster, we will seek to identify in what ways essential nutrient intake differs between college classes (e.g. freshmen, sophomores, etc.) at Utah State University, focusing specifically on water soluble vitamins. We used a convenient snowballing sample to conduct a 24 hour food recall with 5-8 participants per college class. Additionally, each interview included basic demographic information that we believed could impact nutritional intake: Employment status, income, gender, residency (on or off campus), meal plan, marital status, number of children, religious identity, transportation access, and the number of credits that each participant is currently taking, as well as height, weight, and age. Water soluble vitamins are constantly flushed from the body, thus they need to be replaced daily. For this reason, students should be eating foods that contain these vitamins every day. We utilized the USDA Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies (FNDDS) dataset to calculate water-soluable vitamin values for each participant based upon their 24 hour diet recalls. We then entered these values into SPSS and compared to see whether they differed significantly from the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for each participant’s age and gender. Where RDA values are not available we used adequate intake (AI) values. Because participant observation is an integral part of any anthropological study, we also accompanied and observed participants when they went to the grocery store, to understand what factors went into choosing foods.