Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Do parental and cultural factors play a role in overeating behaviors among Latino youth?

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Psychology Department

Faculty Mentor

Rick Cruz

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Research has indicated that certain parenting practices, such as parental monitoring, warmth, and discipline, play a crucial role in the shaping of a child’s eating behaviors. However, much of this research has been done with White families, and the research with Latino families is lacking. This is a large issue, as established literature has found that parenting practices may not have the same effect on Latino adolescents as they do on White adolescents. Further, Latino families are influenced by cultural factors, such as traditional family values (familism), which have been associated with decreased engagement in risky behaviors. However, the influence of greater familism on adolescent eating behaviors has not been established. The purpose of this study is to examine how familism and parenting practices influence overeating behaviors in Latino adolescents. We hypothesized that greater levels of parental monitoring and discipline, and lower levels of parental warmth and familism, will lead to more overeating in Latino adolescents.

The Choices Youth Health Study is a pilot project that examined cultural, contextual and individual factors that influence risky behavior among Latino adolescents (N=50) ages 13-17. Recruitment methods included community and social media advertising. Trained interviewers secured parent permission/child assent and guided youth through a 1.5-hour interview including questionnaires, a behavioral task and collection of salivary samples. Our preliminary analyses indicate that parental control was nearing significance in predicting overeating behaviors in Latino adolescents (b = 2.56, OR= 12.95, p = .07). This finding suggests that adolescents whose parents control their behaviors (e.g., what they wear or watch on TV) are more likely to engage in overeating than those whose parents do not. It is important to examine this association further with a larger sample. Nonetheless, these results may be helpful in informing efforts aimed at addressing overeating behaviors in Latino adolescents.

Location

South Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 1:15 PM

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Chandler Benney

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Apr 13th, 12:00 PM Apr 13th, 1:15 PM

Do parental and cultural factors play a role in overeating behaviors among Latino youth?

South Atrium

Research has indicated that certain parenting practices, such as parental monitoring, warmth, and discipline, play a crucial role in the shaping of a child’s eating behaviors. However, much of this research has been done with White families, and the research with Latino families is lacking. This is a large issue, as established literature has found that parenting practices may not have the same effect on Latino adolescents as they do on White adolescents. Further, Latino families are influenced by cultural factors, such as traditional family values (familism), which have been associated with decreased engagement in risky behaviors. However, the influence of greater familism on adolescent eating behaviors has not been established. The purpose of this study is to examine how familism and parenting practices influence overeating behaviors in Latino adolescents. We hypothesized that greater levels of parental monitoring and discipline, and lower levels of parental warmth and familism, will lead to more overeating in Latino adolescents.

The Choices Youth Health Study is a pilot project that examined cultural, contextual and individual factors that influence risky behavior among Latino adolescents (N=50) ages 13-17. Recruitment methods included community and social media advertising. Trained interviewers secured parent permission/child assent and guided youth through a 1.5-hour interview including questionnaires, a behavioral task and collection of salivary samples. Our preliminary analyses indicate that parental control was nearing significance in predicting overeating behaviors in Latino adolescents (b = 2.56, OR= 12.95, p = .07). This finding suggests that adolescents whose parents control their behaviors (e.g., what they wear or watch on TV) are more likely to engage in overeating than those whose parents do not. It is important to examine this association further with a larger sample. Nonetheless, these results may be helpful in informing efforts aimed at addressing overeating behaviors in Latino adolescents.