Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

College Students Use of the R-Word

Presenter Information

Myles MaxeyFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2019

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Family, Consumer, and Human Development Department

Faculty Mentor

Troy Beckert

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

What was once a clinical term for individuals with ID—mental retardation—has acquired a negative connotation, meant to demean and denigrate others, that extends far beyond the original clinical definition of mental retardation (Schalock et al., 2007; Siperstein, Pociask, & Collins, 2010). Irrespective of the context, hearing the words retard and retarded used as slang invectives is demeaning to those who have intellectual disabilities as well as to their families, friends, and advocates (Degeneffe & Terciano, 2011; Ditchman et al., 2013; Stephens, 2008; Walsh, 2002). Previous research has been examined the perception of the r-word among youth and adolescents (Siperstein et al., 2010; Albert, Jacobs, & Siperstein, 2016). However, the same has not been done with college students. Thus, the purpose of this was to examine the use of and bystander behavior in response to hearing the word “retard” among college students.

A sample of 370 undergraduate students (81% female) from USU was recruited to explore use of the r-word and response to the use of the r-word using the Perceptions of Intellectual Disability and the ‘r-word’ survey. For analysis purposes, respondents were asked to provide their major area of study. Additionally, gender groups were analyzed separately to understand differences between males and females. Finally, the use and response to hearing the r-word was evaluated based on whether it was directed toward someone with or without intellectual disabilities. This poster will highlight overall use of the r-word, both at any point in the participant’s life and since coming to college, and the response to the use of the r-word. These will also be highlighted in the poster by major, age, and gender. The poster will focus on the comparisons and contrasts across use and perception of the r-word, explore implications of these findings, and suggest recommendations for further research.

Location

South Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 1:15 PM

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Apr 13th, 12:00 PM Apr 13th, 1:15 PM

College Students Use of the R-Word

South Atrium

What was once a clinical term for individuals with ID—mental retardation—has acquired a negative connotation, meant to demean and denigrate others, that extends far beyond the original clinical definition of mental retardation (Schalock et al., 2007; Siperstein, Pociask, & Collins, 2010). Irrespective of the context, hearing the words retard and retarded used as slang invectives is demeaning to those who have intellectual disabilities as well as to their families, friends, and advocates (Degeneffe & Terciano, 2011; Ditchman et al., 2013; Stephens, 2008; Walsh, 2002). Previous research has been examined the perception of the r-word among youth and adolescents (Siperstein et al., 2010; Albert, Jacobs, & Siperstein, 2016). However, the same has not been done with college students. Thus, the purpose of this was to examine the use of and bystander behavior in response to hearing the word “retard” among college students.

A sample of 370 undergraduate students (81% female) from USU was recruited to explore use of the r-word and response to the use of the r-word using the Perceptions of Intellectual Disability and the ‘r-word’ survey. For analysis purposes, respondents were asked to provide their major area of study. Additionally, gender groups were analyzed separately to understand differences between males and females. Finally, the use and response to hearing the r-word was evaluated based on whether it was directed toward someone with or without intellectual disabilities. This poster will highlight overall use of the r-word, both at any point in the participant’s life and since coming to college, and the response to the use of the r-word. These will also be highlighted in the poster by major, age, and gender. The poster will focus on the comparisons and contrasts across use and perception of the r-word, explore implications of these findings, and suggest recommendations for further research.