Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

The Effect of Competitive and Collaborative Interruptions on Therapeutic Alliance in Couples Counseling

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Psychology Department

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Megan Oka

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Gender plays an important role in how likely couples are to be in therapy. Women are more likely to initiate therapy, whereas men are more likely to initiate termination of therapy. Earlier studies show that therapists are more likely to interrupt men than women. Preliminary findings in this study show that therapists interrupting women has no impact on therapeutic alliance, but the more therapists interrupt men, the less satisfied both men and women report being with the therapist. This study aims to examine the relationship between the ways therapists interrupt their clients and client perceptions of satisfaction with their therapists, as well as variations between gender of clients and therapists. To collect data, we will analyze videos of heterosexual couples in the first session of couple therapy in five-minute segments at the beginning, middle, and end of the session. We will also analyze client reports of therapeutic alliance immediately following the sessions. Videos, from the University of Connecticut, were previously coded for interruptions by a different team of coders. Using NOLDUS software, we will be returning to the previously coded interruptions and determining if those interruptions are competitive or collaborative. Competitive interruptions are defined as interruptions that further the agenda of the person interrupting and disrupt the person who was speaking. Collaborative interruptions are defined as interruptions that assist clients or therapists in expressing thoughts and feelings. Each video will be coded independently by two coders who maintain at least 75% inter-rater reliability. Using linear regression, we will examine the relationship between frequency of therapist interruptions and client reports of satisfaction with their therapists by type of interruption and by gender. We plan to use this data to train therapists to better respond to clients, taking gender into consideration.

Location

South Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 12:00 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 1:15 PM

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Apr 13th, 12:00 PM Apr 13th, 1:15 PM

The Effect of Competitive and Collaborative Interruptions on Therapeutic Alliance in Couples Counseling

South Atrium

Gender plays an important role in how likely couples are to be in therapy. Women are more likely to initiate therapy, whereas men are more likely to initiate termination of therapy. Earlier studies show that therapists are more likely to interrupt men than women. Preliminary findings in this study show that therapists interrupting women has no impact on therapeutic alliance, but the more therapists interrupt men, the less satisfied both men and women report being with the therapist. This study aims to examine the relationship between the ways therapists interrupt their clients and client perceptions of satisfaction with their therapists, as well as variations between gender of clients and therapists. To collect data, we will analyze videos of heterosexual couples in the first session of couple therapy in five-minute segments at the beginning, middle, and end of the session. We will also analyze client reports of therapeutic alliance immediately following the sessions. Videos, from the University of Connecticut, were previously coded for interruptions by a different team of coders. Using NOLDUS software, we will be returning to the previously coded interruptions and determining if those interruptions are competitive or collaborative. Competitive interruptions are defined as interruptions that further the agenda of the person interrupting and disrupt the person who was speaking. Collaborative interruptions are defined as interruptions that assist clients or therapists in expressing thoughts and feelings. Each video will be coded independently by two coders who maintain at least 75% inter-rater reliability. Using linear regression, we will examine the relationship between frequency of therapist interruptions and client reports of satisfaction with their therapists by type of interruption and by gender. We plan to use this data to train therapists to better respond to clients, taking gender into consideration.