Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Does Familiarity with a Talker's Voice Facilitate Speech in Noise?

Presenter Information

Madison BuntrockFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2018

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education Department

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Brittan Barker

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Research shows that a listener’s familiarity with a talker makes them more understandable in background noise (Ambercrombie, 1967; Martin, Millennix, Pisoni, & Summers, 1989; Goggin, Thompson, Strube, & Simental, 1991), and aids in glimpsing (Cooke, 2006). However, we don’t know if familiarity is facilitative or detrimental in natural listening tasks.

The aim of our study was to determine whether or not a listener’s familiarity with a talker improves intelligibility in the presence of complex, ecologically valid background noise. We used a yoked design with talker familiarity as the independent variable (familiar professor, novel professor) and Key word accuracy was the dependent variable. Talker familiarity was manipulated, the participants listened to a recording of the talker (novel or familiar) reading in a normal voice Harvard sentences, low probability sentences, while background noise played (background noise and cafeteria noise) tested at -4dB and -6.5 dB. These conditions were counterbalanced across participants. Predicted results are those familiar with the talker will find the talker more intelligible than those in the novel voice condition. It is also expected that participants will score better in the restaurant background noise due to increased opportunities to glimpse.

Location

Room 204

Start Date

4-13-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 2:45 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 1:30 PM Apr 13th, 2:45 PM

Does Familiarity with a Talker's Voice Facilitate Speech in Noise?

Room 204

Research shows that a listener’s familiarity with a talker makes them more understandable in background noise (Ambercrombie, 1967; Martin, Millennix, Pisoni, & Summers, 1989; Goggin, Thompson, Strube, & Simental, 1991), and aids in glimpsing (Cooke, 2006). However, we don’t know if familiarity is facilitative or detrimental in natural listening tasks.

The aim of our study was to determine whether or not a listener’s familiarity with a talker improves intelligibility in the presence of complex, ecologically valid background noise. We used a yoked design with talker familiarity as the independent variable (familiar professor, novel professor) and Key word accuracy was the dependent variable. Talker familiarity was manipulated, the participants listened to a recording of the talker (novel or familiar) reading in a normal voice Harvard sentences, low probability sentences, while background noise played (background noise and cafeteria noise) tested at -4dB and -6.5 dB. These conditions were counterbalanced across participants. Predicted results are those familiar with the talker will find the talker more intelligible than those in the novel voice condition. It is also expected that participants will score better in the restaurant background noise due to increased opportunities to glimpse.