Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Ride time science: Talking science in a cycling community of practice

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences Department

Faculty Mentor

Victor R Lee

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Hobbies can be an excellent way to spend one’s leisure time. Through hobbies, we can pursue self-identified interests (Azevedo 2012). Hobbies are also spaces for important learning. Most obviously, hobbyists learn how to do their hobby better—how to get more food out of their garden, how to beat the boss level, how to run a faster marathon. However, hobbies can also be spaces for learning and engaging with scientific concepts and practices. World of Warcraft players engage in evidence-based argumentation while planning group raids (Steinkuehler & Duncan 2008). Successful fantasy sports team managers use advanced statistics to assemble their lineups (Halverson & Halverson 2008).

Hobbies can also be spaces where participants can have direct, physical experience with scientific phenomena (NRC 2009). One such hobby is cycling. Riding a bicycle is an activity that is simple enough that children can master it. It is an excellent mode of transportation and exercise. Cycling as discussed here necessarily involves lycra, expensive bicycles, and riding fast. Equally important to cycling is participation in a cycling community of practice (Wenger) and their weekly “group ride.” Within the context of these group rides, cyclists cover 30-50 miles over varying terrain at an average of 20 mph. Through their participation in these rides, cyclists experience the effects of air resistance and mechanical advantage in unique ways. Drawing on video recordings and field notes from two years of observation in a cycling community of practice, this presentation examines the ways that cyclists talk about and engage with these scientific phenomena during their rides.

Location

Room 421

Start Date

4-13-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 2:45 PM

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Apr 13th, 1:30 PM Apr 13th, 2:45 PM

Ride time science: Talking science in a cycling community of practice

Room 421

Hobbies can be an excellent way to spend one’s leisure time. Through hobbies, we can pursue self-identified interests (Azevedo 2012). Hobbies are also spaces for important learning. Most obviously, hobbyists learn how to do their hobby better—how to get more food out of their garden, how to beat the boss level, how to run a faster marathon. However, hobbies can also be spaces for learning and engaging with scientific concepts and practices. World of Warcraft players engage in evidence-based argumentation while planning group raids (Steinkuehler & Duncan 2008). Successful fantasy sports team managers use advanced statistics to assemble their lineups (Halverson & Halverson 2008).

Hobbies can also be spaces where participants can have direct, physical experience with scientific phenomena (NRC 2009). One such hobby is cycling. Riding a bicycle is an activity that is simple enough that children can master it. It is an excellent mode of transportation and exercise. Cycling as discussed here necessarily involves lycra, expensive bicycles, and riding fast. Equally important to cycling is participation in a cycling community of practice (Wenger) and their weekly “group ride.” Within the context of these group rides, cyclists cover 30-50 miles over varying terrain at an average of 20 mph. Through their participation in these rides, cyclists experience the effects of air resistance and mechanical advantage in unique ways. Drawing on video recordings and field notes from two years of observation in a cycling community of practice, this presentation examines the ways that cyclists talk about and engage with these scientific phenomena during their rides.