Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Vegetarian/Vegan Nutrient Intake at USU

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department

Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology Department

Faculty Mentor

Michelle Grocke

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

This research study focuses on the vegetarian and vegan groups in our community, specifically undergraduates at USU. The specialized diets vegetarians and vegans follow can cause nutritional deficiency in iron and protein. Iron and protein are particularly difficult for vegetarians and vegans to obtain, especially for those new to the diet. Our research study seeks to identify whether on and off campus vegetarians and vegans obtain sufficient iron and protein levels according to the USDA’s recommended daily amounts. This was accomplished through participant 24 hour diet recalls. Data gathered from the 24hr diet recall included time of day, amount, type, and preparation method. Data was analyzed on the USDA Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies to identify levels of iron and protein intake. On and off campus groups were compared to identify possible confounding geographic factors. Through this research we can help vegetarians and vegans in the USU student body understand how they can improve their iron and protein intake.

Location

Room 421

Start Date

4-13-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 2:45 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 1:30 PM Apr 13th, 2:45 PM

Vegetarian/Vegan Nutrient Intake at USU

Room 421

This research study focuses on the vegetarian and vegan groups in our community, specifically undergraduates at USU. The specialized diets vegetarians and vegans follow can cause nutritional deficiency in iron and protein. Iron and protein are particularly difficult for vegetarians and vegans to obtain, especially for those new to the diet. Our research study seeks to identify whether on and off campus vegetarians and vegans obtain sufficient iron and protein levels according to the USDA’s recommended daily amounts. This was accomplished through participant 24 hour diet recalls. Data gathered from the 24hr diet recall included time of day, amount, type, and preparation method. Data was analyzed on the USDA Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies to identify levels of iron and protein intake. On and off campus groups were compared to identify possible confounding geographic factors. Through this research we can help vegetarians and vegans in the USU student body understand how they can improve their iron and protein intake.