Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Effects of Dietary Carboxymethyl Lysine on the Gut Microbiome of Mice fed the Total Western Diet.

Presenter Information

Niklas AardemaFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences

Department

Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Sciences Department

Faculty Mentor

Korry Hintze

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Effects of Dietary Carboxymethyl Lysine on the Gut Microbiome of Mice fed the Total Western Diet.

Niklas Aardema1, Robert Ward1, David Dang1, Siyu Xiao1, Ashli Hunter2 and Korry Hintze1

1Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 84322

2Department of Animal, Dairy, and Veterinary Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 84322

Our bodies are home to tens of trillions of bacteria. These microbes primarily inhabit our skin, mouth, and gut. Previous studies have shown that Western diets high in fat and sugar can have an impact on the variety and composition of the gut microbiome, and such studies have been repeatable. However, the effects of Western dietary patterns in conjunction with carboxymethyl lysine (CML, a cooked food byproduct associated with increased cardiovascular disease) on the gut microbiome have not been specifically investigated. We used the Total Western Diet (TWD) in order to observe these changes in mice; this diet reflects approximately the 50th percentile of daily macro and micronutrient intakes in Americans.

We hypothesized that the gut microbiome of mice fed TWD containing various levels of CML would differ from those fed TWD with no CML. We further hypothesized that these changes would be dependent on the dietary CML concentration. The experimental diets were as follows: TWD containing no cooked protein or fat (no CML), TWD containing 20% cooked protein and fat (low CML), and TWD containing 40% cooked protein and fat (high CML).

After a twelve-week feeding period, fecal samples were collected from each of each of the three diet groups. Bacterial DNA was then extracted from fecal samples and analyzed for bacterial composition by 16s genetic sequencing. The effect of experimental diets on gut microbiome taxonomy, alpha diversity, and beta diversity will be presented.

Location

South Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 2:45 PM

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Apr 13th, 1:30 PM Apr 13th, 2:45 PM

Effects of Dietary Carboxymethyl Lysine on the Gut Microbiome of Mice fed the Total Western Diet.

South Atrium

Effects of Dietary Carboxymethyl Lysine on the Gut Microbiome of Mice fed the Total Western Diet.

Niklas Aardema1, Robert Ward1, David Dang1, Siyu Xiao1, Ashli Hunter2 and Korry Hintze1

1Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 84322

2Department of Animal, Dairy, and Veterinary Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 84322

Our bodies are home to tens of trillions of bacteria. These microbes primarily inhabit our skin, mouth, and gut. Previous studies have shown that Western diets high in fat and sugar can have an impact on the variety and composition of the gut microbiome, and such studies have been repeatable. However, the effects of Western dietary patterns in conjunction with carboxymethyl lysine (CML, a cooked food byproduct associated with increased cardiovascular disease) on the gut microbiome have not been specifically investigated. We used the Total Western Diet (TWD) in order to observe these changes in mice; this diet reflects approximately the 50th percentile of daily macro and micronutrient intakes in Americans.

We hypothesized that the gut microbiome of mice fed TWD containing various levels of CML would differ from those fed TWD with no CML. We further hypothesized that these changes would be dependent on the dietary CML concentration. The experimental diets were as follows: TWD containing no cooked protein or fat (no CML), TWD containing 20% cooked protein and fat (low CML), and TWD containing 40% cooked protein and fat (high CML).

After a twelve-week feeding period, fecal samples were collected from each of each of the three diet groups. Bacterial DNA was then extracted from fecal samples and analyzed for bacterial composition by 16s genetic sequencing. The effect of experimental diets on gut microbiome taxonomy, alpha diversity, and beta diversity will be presented.