Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

James Burgh, Legislative Representation, and American Revolutionary Thought

Presenter Information

Reid LuzzaderFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department

Political Science Department

Faculty Mentor

Peter McNamara

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

The purpose of my study is to examine the writings of the unjustly obscure English radical James Burgh and his influence on Revolutionary-era American thought. It focuses on ideas of achieving a just and effective representation of people in the legislative branch, free from control or overreach from the executive. This major theme of Burgh's writings most interested the Founders. Starting with proof that James Burgh's political writings were widely read and accepted as authoritative works, it uses two case studies to demonstrate this influence. It discusses the citation by Thomas Paine of Burgh's Political Disquisitions in his work Common Sense, and speculates on a direct influence of James Burgh on the political thought of Thomas Paine. It discusses the citations of James Burgh by James Madison in his Federalist Paper #56 and his "Additional Memorandums on Ancient Memorandums on Ancient Modern Confederacies, 1787." In concludes that James Burgh's political thought was closer to the beliefs of the Anti-federalists rather than the Federalists.

Location

Room 101

Start Date

4-13-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 4:15 PM

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Apr 13th, 3:00 PM Apr 13th, 4:15 PM

James Burgh, Legislative Representation, and American Revolutionary Thought

Room 101

The purpose of my study is to examine the writings of the unjustly obscure English radical James Burgh and his influence on Revolutionary-era American thought. It focuses on ideas of achieving a just and effective representation of people in the legislative branch, free from control or overreach from the executive. This major theme of Burgh's writings most interested the Founders. Starting with proof that James Burgh's political writings were widely read and accepted as authoritative works, it uses two case studies to demonstrate this influence. It discusses the citation by Thomas Paine of Burgh's Political Disquisitions in his work Common Sense, and speculates on a direct influence of James Burgh on the political thought of Thomas Paine. It discusses the citations of James Burgh by James Madison in his Federalist Paper #56 and his "Additional Memorandums on Ancient Memorandums on Ancient Modern Confederacies, 1787." In concludes that James Burgh's political thought was closer to the beliefs of the Anti-federalists rather than the Federalists.