Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Comparing Rates of Orderly Data Across Two Delay Discounting Tasks.

Presenter Information

Thomas ArgyleFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Psychology Department

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Gregory Madden

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Delay discounting refers to the devaluation of future outcomes, with the more distant a reward the more it is devalued. Delay discounting is typically measured in humans via questionnaires using hypothetical rewards. These questionnaires usually produce orderly data according to established criteria, but these tasks do create some amount of unorderly data; the latter is problematic because these data usually must be discarded. In a previous study in our lab, the extent to which three different delay discounting tasks produced orderly data was examined. One task produced significantly more unorderly data than the others; and the amount of unorderly data across the other tasks (a dynamic titrating-amount task and a simple dichotomous choice task) was undifferentiated. However, of the two undifferentiated tasks, there was a high rate of incorrect task completion for the dichotomous choice task. The purpose of the present experiment was to re-assess the latter two tasks for degree of unorderly data produced while attempting to rectify issues of participants incorrectly completing tasks. The results of this experiment will help establish which of the two tasks produces most orderly data.

Location

South Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 4:15 PM

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Apr 13th, 3:00 PM Apr 13th, 4:15 PM

Comparing Rates of Orderly Data Across Two Delay Discounting Tasks.

South Atrium

Delay discounting refers to the devaluation of future outcomes, with the more distant a reward the more it is devalued. Delay discounting is typically measured in humans via questionnaires using hypothetical rewards. These questionnaires usually produce orderly data according to established criteria, but these tasks do create some amount of unorderly data; the latter is problematic because these data usually must be discarded. In a previous study in our lab, the extent to which three different delay discounting tasks produced orderly data was examined. One task produced significantly more unorderly data than the others; and the amount of unorderly data across the other tasks (a dynamic titrating-amount task and a simple dichotomous choice task) was undifferentiated. However, of the two undifferentiated tasks, there was a high rate of incorrect task completion for the dichotomous choice task. The purpose of the present experiment was to re-assess the latter two tasks for degree of unorderly data produced while attempting to rectify issues of participants incorrectly completing tasks. The results of this experiment will help establish which of the two tasks produces most orderly data.