Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Technology as a Parenting Tool

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2020

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Department

Family, Consumer, and Human Development Department

Faculty Mentor

Sarah Tulane

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

This study uses a qualitative approach to better understand how parents are using interactive technology to parent their early adolescents (ages 12 to 15). Where interactive technology use is becoming more common at younger ages, and interactive technology is a preferred communication method for teens, this is an important topic to understand in more depth. Ten dyads (parent and a teen between the ages of 12 and 15) will be recruited using a variation on snowball sampling. Participants will fill out a brief (5 to 10 minute) questionnaire gathering demographic data and basic information about personal interactive technology use. Participants will complete a phone interview (20 to 40 minutes) answering questions about parenting and interactive technology use. Demographic and quantitative data gathered on from the questionnaire will be analyzed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data received from phone interviews will be analyzed using qualitative dyadic analysis techniques (Eisikovits & Koren, 2010).

Location

South Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 4:15 PM

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Apr 13th, 3:00 PM Apr 13th, 4:15 PM

Technology as a Parenting Tool

South Atrium

This study uses a qualitative approach to better understand how parents are using interactive technology to parent their early adolescents (ages 12 to 15). Where interactive technology use is becoming more common at younger ages, and interactive technology is a preferred communication method for teens, this is an important topic to understand in more depth. Ten dyads (parent and a teen between the ages of 12 and 15) will be recruited using a variation on snowball sampling. Participants will fill out a brief (5 to 10 minute) questionnaire gathering demographic data and basic information about personal interactive technology use. Participants will complete a phone interview (20 to 40 minutes) answering questions about parenting and interactive technology use. Demographic and quantitative data gathered on from the questionnaire will be analyzed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data received from phone interviews will be analyzed using qualitative dyadic analysis techniques (Eisikovits & Koren, 2010).