Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

What's Up With Fat?

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences

Department

Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Sciences Department

Faculty Mentor

Sheryl Aguilar

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Background: Didactic dietetic students felt that "dietary fat phobia" is an apparent issue at Utah State University that needed to be addressed. Additionally, using a variety of teaching methods such as interactive games, food tasting, and informational pamphlets to reach a variety of individual learning preferences.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of booths on educating about fat and fat containing foods in Food Day attendees.

Setting: Food Day 2016 at Utah State University in the Taggart Student Center Hub

Methods: Food Day participants (84) completed a pre-survey (including a 27 item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and 16 questions on knowledge, self-efficacy and intent to change) before entering and a post-survey before leaving. Participants (47) completed a follow-up survey 4 weeks later. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to evaluate knowledge, self-efficacy, and intent to change questions. Paired t-test found mean differences in pre and follow-up FFQ.

Results: Participants spent an average of 21 minutes at Food Day. Knowledge and self- efficacy showed more of a short-term effect as opposed to a longer-term. At follow-up, participants reported consuming less whole milk, full fat dairy products, nuts, medium and high fat meats (p

Conclusion: Food Day 2016 had a positive effect on students' perception of fat in foods and the effect on health but less impact on food habits related to fat intake.

Location

North Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

4-13-2017 4:15 PM

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Apr 13th, 3:00 PM Apr 13th, 4:15 PM

What's Up With Fat?

North Atrium

Background: Didactic dietetic students felt that "dietary fat phobia" is an apparent issue at Utah State University that needed to be addressed. Additionally, using a variety of teaching methods such as interactive games, food tasting, and informational pamphlets to reach a variety of individual learning preferences.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of booths on educating about fat and fat containing foods in Food Day attendees.

Setting: Food Day 2016 at Utah State University in the Taggart Student Center Hub

Methods: Food Day participants (84) completed a pre-survey (including a 27 item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and 16 questions on knowledge, self-efficacy and intent to change) before entering and a post-survey before leaving. Participants (47) completed a follow-up survey 4 weeks later. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to evaluate knowledge, self-efficacy, and intent to change questions. Paired t-test found mean differences in pre and follow-up FFQ.

Results: Participants spent an average of 21 minutes at Food Day. Knowledge and self- efficacy showed more of a short-term effect as opposed to a longer-term. At follow-up, participants reported consuming less whole milk, full fat dairy products, nuts, medium and high fat meats (p

Conclusion: Food Day 2016 had a positive effect on students' perception of fat in foods and the effect on health but less impact on food habits related to fat intake.